Robbery


Robbery

West Palm Beach Robbery Attorney David W. Olson

 

Robbery charges require immediate and effective representation from a skilled and experienced West Palm Beach criminal defense lawyer. Depending on the specific charges and the circumstances of the case, a robbery conviction can potentially result in a life sentence.

 

West Palm Beach criminal defense lawyer David Olson represents adult and juvenile clients charged with robbery, theft and all other felonies and misdemeanors. It is always advisable to hire an attorney as soon as possible after the arrest so that a skilled legal professional can immediately handle the ensuing events and start preparing your legal defense. Attorney David Olson offers a free case review.

 

What is Robbery in Florida?

 

There are various robbery offenses in Florida with which an accused may be charged. Robbery falls under Chapter 812 of the Florida Statutes – Theft, Robbery, and Related Crimes:

 

  • “Robbery” means the taking of money or other property which may be the subject of larceny from the person or custody of another, with intent to either permanently or temporarily deprive the person or the owner of the money or other property, when in the course of the taking there is the use of force, violence, assault or putting in fear.” Sec. 812.13(1)

 

Basically, robbery is a theft offense that involves violence or the threat of violence. The specific charges will depend on a number of factors, including:

 

  • Whether a weapon was involved and if so, the type of weapon
  • Whether there was force, intimidation or threat, and if so, its extent

 

Example of robbery:

 

  • A is walking down the street. B runs up to A brandishing a gun in his hand, and says to A ,“Give me your wallet.” A hands over his wallet to B, fearing that if he does not, he will be shot and killed. It is not necessary for B to have to say, “Give me your wallet or I will shoot or kill you,” nor is it necessary for physical contact to occur.

 

Robbery by Sudden Snatching

 

  • “Robbery by sudden snatching” means the taking of money or other property from the victim’s person, with intent to permanently or temporarily deprive the victim or the owner of the money or other property, when, in the course of the taking, the victim was or became aware of the taking…  Sec. 812.131

 

Robbery by sudden snatching differs from strong arm robbery in that the elements of force, violence, intimidation or threats need not be present during the robbery for the prosecution to prove its case. The victim does not have to resist the robbery. As well, the victim does not have to experience an injury. He or she only needs to be aware of the act of the robbery as the money or property is taken from his or her person.

 

Example of robbery by sudden snatching:

 

  • Two men, A and B, are sitting on a park bench. A feels the hand of B reaching into A’s pocket stealing A’s wallet.

 

Note that if a weapon is used the offense can be charged as a second degree felony, potentially resulting in a 15 year mandatory minimum sentence. If no weapon is involved, the offense can be charged as a third degree felony, possibly resulting in a 5 year sentence. Fines also potentially increase to $10,000 and $5,000, respectively.

 

The Law Offices of David W. Olson

 

If you were arrested for robbery, armed robbery, robbery by sudden snatching or any other theft or criminal charge, it is vital to obtain effective legal representation immediately. David Olson has 33 years of experience representing clients charged with Florida and federal felonies and misdemeanors.

 

Attorney Olson will always seek the most favorable outcome possible for your particular case.  Cases have resulted in dismissals, dropped and reduced charges, favorable plea negotiations and a variety of alternatives to incarceration. David Olson represents clients in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Broward County, Miami-Dade County, South Florida and throughout the entire state. For a confidential, free, no-obligation case review, call 561-833-8866.

 

Source

 

Chapter 812, Florida Statutes (2014)